Closer Readings

11 Result(s)
Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage and History in the U.S.

The month of May is an opportunity for reflection on and commemoration of all that AAPI individuals and organizations have accomplished and contributed to U.S. history and culture. This piece highlights NEH projects and classroom resources for teaching about these experiences in America.

Summer Days & Nights with the NEH

Whether you are taking a long road trip, headed to a local museum, or hanging around the house this summer, you will find that the National Endowment for the Humanities is just around the corner (or already in your hands). This collection of resources highlights NEH sponsored programs available across the country and includes projects aligned with some of the 50th anniversary events being commemorated this summer—most notably Stonewall, the moon landing, and Woodstock. No matter your summer plans, you don’t have to go far to enjoy a NEH sponsored exhibition or program.

Jazz Beyond Borders: Jazz Appreciation Month 2019

Now celebrated in more than 40 countries, Jazz Appreciation Month offers an opportunity to explore cultural dynamics that inform jazz music across places, as well as the idiosyncratic ways in which jazz artists reimagine and perform their local for the global.

African American History in the United States

In this special revised and updated feature for Black History Month, teachers, parents, and students will find a collection of NEH-supported websites and EDSITEment-developed lessons that tell the four-hundred-year old story of African Americans from slavery through freedom and citizenship to the presidency.

World War I and American Art: Part Two

Last time, I began to survey how American artists viewed the Great War (1914–1918). This NEH-supported exhibition, World War I and American Art, has uncovered forgotten works that could help teachers illustrate and illuminate the course of the war, the political opinions pro and con, and the enormous human toll it had on the nation and the world. This week, I’ll talk about some neglected artists who deserve to be remembered as powerful and passionate witnesses to the carnage both on the battlefields and in the hospitals afterward.

World War I and American Art: Part One

World War I (1914-1918) has been called the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century, leading to the destruction of four empires (Russian, German, Austrian-Hungrian, and Ottoman), the rise of communism and fascism, the Second World War, and even the Cold War.

Arthur Miller’s The Crucible: Witch Hunting for the Classroom

In their book Salem Possessed, Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum remark upon the prominent place the Salem witch trials have in America's cultural consciousness. They observe, “For most Americans the episode ranks in familiarity somewhere between Plymouth Rock and Custer's last stand.”

Emanuel Leutze’s Symbolic Scene of Washington Crossing the Delaware

We know General George Washington crossed the Delaware River to attack Britain’s Hessian army at Trenton on Christmas night in 1776. At the mention of this event, most Americans imagine a heroic Washington standing in a small boat. But, did this happen? How has the art of Emanuel Leutze influenced the telling of history?